Showing posts with label churros. Show all posts
Showing posts with label churros. Show all posts

El Pueblito Mexican Restaurant (Bracebridge)

How can you not feel cheerful entering El Pueblito Mexican Restaurant? The cozy dining room is swathed in lively colours galore and there are tons of knick knacks to see while waiting. Unfortunately, you’ll be waiting – to place your order, get drinks, get food, and pay. At least I’ve grown… when in cottage country, I learn to slow down and just enjoy the experience.

A few dishes feature their fish-of-the-day, which was pickerel for the ceviche and tacos during our summer visit. Marinated and cured in an acid of lime and tomatoes, the fish takes on a pink hue in the ceviche ($16) and has the taste of a lighter Arctic char. It’s wonderfully fresh, either by itself or scooped onto a crispy thin tortilla chip, the citrus acid nicely balanced with a hint of heat.

The starter just needed more salt. In fact, all their dishes need more seasoning. Perhaps El Pueblito is trying to respect an ingredient’s natural flavours or cater to Bracebridge’s older demographic, but everything needed an extra hit of salt to finish the dish – maybe they should just leave some at each table.

The same pickerel tasted completely different in the fish tacos ($20), once lightly grilled and topped with pineapple salsa. Since the fish isn’t deep fried and there’s not a typical slaw topping, the tacos are soft; I wish there was a crunchy element to provide textural interest – even some finely chopped bell peppers and red onion would be great.

Still, the tacos were tasty – the corn tortillas chewy and fresh, and the spicy mayo and tomatillo salsa great condiments for the dish. The refried beans were rich and smooth, lovely on its own or smooshed into the rice. The grains get even better once you add in consommé and chopped onions (from the birria tacos). In the end, the fish tacos are a little soft but at least they’re not messy to eat.

Consequently, the complete opposite experience of having a birria taco ($20). Stuffed with beef and deep fried, these arrive blistering hot and need to be wrapped in a tissue to dunk. Having seen many people have the dish at food trucks, it’s a wonder how anyone isn’t covered in consommé and grease without a proper table and dishware. If you’re ordering these, it’s best not to wear white.

The slowly cooked beef was plentiful and tender, but because under seasoned meat and consommé, we couldn’t help feel that the birrias were missing something. I was waiting for a flavourful explosion to erupt, only to be met with a slow-moving stream of lava. The flavours improved once we added tons of the raw onion, cilantro, and avocado into the crispy hot taco, a few sparks in the lava stream.

Saving room for churros ($10 for 6) is essential. When our server asked us whether we wanted six or ten of the pastries, I thought it must be a rehearsed question as why would two people need more than six? One bite into the hot hollow logs of fried dough and we were hooked. Dusted with cinnamon sugar they were already delicious, but a dunk into a creamy thick not-overly-sweet caramel and the dessert was absolutely sublime. Yeah, so maybe we could have devoured ten.

El Pueblito isn’t a large space, so you’ll likely be seated quicker if you’re a table of four or less. For such a small dining room, it’s perplexing on why it’s so difficult to get someone’s attention, especially when there’s no shortage of staff (we counted at least six people working that evening). Perhaps the outdoor patio really divides attention, or the servers need to help in the kitchen, but it’s best to order as much as possible at the beginning of the meal to avoid playing where’s Waldo.

Just make sure you order a starter and are equipped with cervezas - a cold drink with crispy chips will hopefully keep the hangry monster at bay. And remember, you’re likely on vacation, so be patient and take it easy.

Overall mark - 8 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Bracebridge, Canada
 Address: 155 Manitoba Street


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____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


Is That It? I Want More!

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COYA (Dubai)

Special thanks to Parv for so many of the photos in this post
You’ll find COYA on a busy cul de sac of restaurants at Dubai’s Four Seasons. After getting through the queue of cars being dropped off with the valet and the throng of people making their way to the many establishments in the area, the actual restaurant is a welcoming serene environment.

The colourful bar and dining room works well with the restaurant’s Peruvian menu. Quirky artwork adorning the wall is great for starting conversations and keeps the atmosphere fun and cheerful. There’s still an air of sophistication to the décor – the colours are done in rich jewel-toned hues and with lux velvet. And it’s the attentive service and little touches, like the mini shelf for purses that retract from the chairs like a CD player, which reminds you that you’re still at the Four Seasons.


COYA’s ceviche are one of the most ordered dishes and I can see why. The pargo a la trufa ceviche (AED88) uses chunks of tender red snapper that are gently marinated with a not-too-citrusy ponzu and jazzed up with chives. Even the truffle oil, an ingredient that can sometimes get overpowering, was present in scent and only slightly lingered on the tongue. Absolutely delicious and a great start to the meal.


The salmon tacos (AED60) may be more accurately described as a tostada: cubes of salmon and avocado sitting on a crispy fried tortilla. Once again, the dish didn’t lack flavour, but the strong ingredients (in this case the aji amarillo chilli) added just a bit of heat still allowing us to taste the fish.


While the pulpo rostizado (AED92) is described as a ‘small dish’, the portion was just as big as some of the mains. The protein was prepared wonderfully - you barely need to bite to get through the tendrils of roasted octopus. Yet, there’s something topping the creamed potatoes that wasn’t my cup of tea – the garlic chips and bits of olives covering the silky spuds gave it a bitter finish.


COYA offers tons of seafood on their menu. The lubina Chilena (AED180) leans towards the Japanese influences of Peruvian cuisine tasting like miso black cod rather than anything to do with the aji amarillo described on the menu. Nevertheless, the fish is cooked beautifully and it was a tasty rendition of miso cod.


I would go back for an entire langosta iron pot (AED158) for myself. The rice a luscious risotto that stays warm in the clay vessel. It’s everything I want with a risotto – creamy texture, just enough moisture, and filled with lobster essence with a bit of pea shoot for freshness.


COYA prepares chicken well, their pollo a la parrilla (AED148) arrives as four pieces of juicy and tender boneless meat with a fiery looking sauce covering it. Don’t worry, the aji panca is all look and no spice, instead adding a smoky flavour and aroma to the fowl. For me, how well a restaurant prepares chicken is a marker of their chefs’ talent. After all, it’s a protein that needs to be cooked thoroughly and has a rather neutral taste.


It’s not like the bife angosto wagyu (AED460), the beef so well-marbled that even being a sirloin cut there was plenty of flavourful fat covering the tongue. It’s left a ruby rare and stays that way as the grill it arrives on is all for show and isn’t actually heated. While the steak was tasty enough on its own, COYA’s chimichurri is something else – ultra fresh and the micro cubes of onion creating a great contrast against the rich meat.


Make sure to save room for the churros de naranja (AED52), they are the best I’ve ever had. The pastry’s centre is fluffy and creamy while the outside delightfully crispy. I had my doubts as the menu described them as orange and lime churros with a milk chocolate and dulce de leche sauce – fruit and chocolate should be kept separate in my books. Luckily, all the citrus seemed to lie within the dip so I ate the churros by itself and they were exquisite.


In a city where buildings and new restaurants and being constructed at a mile-a-minute I can see why COYA is still busy and respected since its opening in 2014. What a great meal for the senses, for both taste and sight.

Overall mark - 9 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates
 Address: Restaurant Village Four Seasons Resort 

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog
____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


Is That It? I Want More!

Other Gastro World posts similar to this:

COYA Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Baro (Toronto)


Blink and you’ll momentarily think you’ve been transported back to Valdez – a similar long dining room and open concept kitchen along one wall certainly caused a sense of déjà vu for me. Of course, there’s been upgrades: the gorgeous wooden arch at the entrance and the emerald banquette seating a comfortable improvement from the stools used in the former restaurant.

The menu continues to offer Latin American dishes with a twist. The Nikkei ceviche ($26) is an ideal alternative if you’re not a fan of cilantro as nori slivers are used in lieu of the herb. Cilantro is one ingredient you won’t get away from at Baro – luckily, I love its use.

Delicate cubes of Hamachi are seasoned with a tart ponzu and lime mixture with crispy radish slices for interest. Most surprisingly are the tofu cubes and edamame pods mixed with the fish, ingredients not generally found in ceviche but works. In signature Steve Gonzelez fashion, the accompanying chips were made with a delicious root vegetable (in this case lotus root), its saltiness great for scooping up the citrusy concoction or munching on its own.


While the empanadas ($7) actually arrive in a paper bag (a cute presentation that also helps soak up excess oil), you have to see these three bite snacks in their full glory. They’re some of the best empanadas I’ve eaten, the corn meal crust slightly sweet and oh so crispy. Meanwhile, the beef, potato, and peas filling is saucy, but thick enough so the crust doesn’t get soggy. On the side, a spicy aji sauce accompanies for dipping, but I rather enjoy them au natural.


The chicken wings ($12) were slow to arrive, but worth the wait… especially when they’re blistering hot. Each fair-sized wing’s coating is incredibly crispy and tossed in a thick smoky guava barbeque sauce. A must-try for wing lovers.


A great add-on to a salad is the matambre ($15), a 6 oz. piece of flank steak, which can turn the leafy greens into a complete meal. A roughly chopped chimichurri tops the beef, adding a refreshing element to the steak.


If the OG duck chaufa ($35) reminds you of bibimbap, you’re not the only person. Served in a hot stone bowl, sticky rice is mixed with duck confit and Chef Gonzalez’s sweet and beany Papi kung fu 
sauce... it’s bibimbap gone wild. With a smorgasbord of ingredients including edamame, egg, tobiko and bird’s eye chili, there’s plenty of crunch and flavour. Make sure you share the dish amongst at least three people – it’s a rich affair.


For a more balanced meal, the roasted cod ($32) is a great choice. The fish is simply seasoned and cooked to perfection; much of the flavours comes from the spring succotash and light creamy sauce. Then you bite into one of the sizeable octopus croquettes ­- think of them as seafood paella arinicini - oh what a wonderful crunchy and buttery finish.


In my haste to dig into the churros ($7), I forgot to take a picture but they certainly hit the spot – hot sticks of freshly fried dough dusted with enough cinnamon sugar. You could dip to your heart’s content in all the molten dulce de leche, which was salted and perfect for keeping the dessert from getting too sweet.

Baro is a lively atmosphere and I could listen to our waitress describe the dishes all night – imagine Sofía Vergara (Gloria on Modern Family) explaining in passionate detail all the ingredients that make up a dish.

All the herbs and spices is what makes Baro’s food so great! They’re intense and full of flavours: the ceviche has a tartness that commands attention and the chicken wings tossed in a rich sauce that could go toe-to-toe with a Mexican mole. Seductive flavours that make you want to eat up ever last bit of each dish, a Latin love affair with food. 

Overall mark - 8 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 485 King Street West

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog
____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


Is That It? I Want More!

Other Gastro World posts similar to this:


Baro Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato


CLOSED: Barrio Coreano (Toronto)

Location: Toronto, Canada
Address: 642 Bloor Street West
Type of Meal: Dinner




It’s surprising … I’ve never been to Playa Cabana. Me, a person who loves a good taco! But, after a less than ideal visit to Grand Electric, hyped up Mexican restaurants leave a bad taste in my mouth. So, when my friend introduced me to Barrio Coreano, I was surprised to find out it was fourth restaurant from the Playa Cabana family of restaurants.

Situated in Korean Town, Barrio mixes Mexican and Korean flavours amongst an urban feeling cantina. Bright lights and graffiti-like artwork comingles with wrought-iron and exposed bricks. It has a lively and down-to-earth atmosphere and some beautiful gothic elements in the design as well.


Indeed, it doesn’t feel like you’re in Korean Town, except for the sole Coreano movie poster at the back.


As for the food, the menu is predominantly Mexican. The crowd favourite guacamole ($9) and salsa ($6) didn’t have a banchan (Korean side dish) feel to it. Nonetheless, they were satisfying. The guacamole was thick, creamy and intensely savoury (there didn’t appear to be a drop of lime juice or herb in it).


The salsa tasted fresh but could have benefited from more salt. However, its muted flavour did allow us to add hot sauces into it. At each table were four sauces – a hot spicy green habanero, a slightly milder yellow habanero oil with garlic, a tangy red chili sauce and a chili oil. I highly suggest using the green one sparingly as there’s certainly a kick to it.


This was my first experience having a torta – essentially a fluffy, soft, flat bread stuffed with delicious ingredients. We tried the torta Corean with kalbi (grillied and braised short rib; $10) and the de puerco (a shredded Mexican pulled pork $10). Both were tender, flavourful and filled with ingredients that complimented it well – creamy queso cheese & avocado and a crunchy tart cucumber-radish kimchi.


We over ordered having no clue how big Barrio’s tacos were. For the baha fish tacos (1 for $5 or 3 for $13), we paired it with the “salad” option where it’s wrapped with lettuce rather than tortilla. This is a great take on the Korean bo saam. Given the fish was deep fried, the lettuce helped lighten the taco.  The fish was fairly sized and delicious topped with a napa slaw.


The pulpo al carbon (1 for $6 or 3 for $16) contained a large piece of smoky grilled octopus that was tender but still had some bite to it. To lighten the protein, there was a crunchy cabbage slaw and a thick salsa on top. Personally, I found the tortilla (although soft and fresh) was too heavy with it. I actually enjoyed the octopus solely with the toppings and without the wrap.


Unfortunately, we ended off on a sour note as the fried chihuahua cheese taco (1 for $6 or 3 for $16) was generally detested at the table. Perhaps it’s due to it arriving last and thus suffered from sitting around and becoming soggy. But, the fried cheese was essentially a fritter and insanely heavy with the tortilla shells. But, I sense it wouldn’t be any better with the lettuce as that would make it even soggier.


I’d imagine this would taste better if the cheese was coated with bread crumbs instead so it’d be closer to a mozzarella stick consistency than fritter. Additionally, there was such a liberal portion of habanero sauce on it that it left all our mouths scorching.

Luckily, there was a large ice cube in my no love cocktail ($12) so I resourcefully used it to cool down my tongue. The cocktail was delicious and strong made with gin, Pimm’s, watermelon juice and hibiscus syrup.


Since I was stuffed I opted out of the churros poutine ($9). My friends seemed to be enjoying it but the creamy sauce on the bottom was a miss for some individuals.



Overall, I was pleased with my experience at Barrio Coreano and would be interested in trying another restaurant in the Playa Cabana chain. Their tacos are a tad pricier, but also larger and filled with tons of ingredients. So maybe popular Mexican restaurants are not all made the same – the music isn’t overwhelmingly loud, you’re allowed to make reservations and you’re not expected to pack yourself into a shared table. Olé!  

Overall mark - 7.5 out of 10

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog

____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!



CLOSED: Mesa Grill (Bahamas)

Location: Paradise Island, Bahamas 
Address: 1 Casino Drive West (inside The Cove at the Atlantis)
Type of Meal: Dinner


During our last visit to Atlantis, a conference was taking place and snapping up reservations at many restaurants across the resort. Mesa Grill was one of those spots that was booked solid for dinner. It was a bit disappointing I wouldn’t be able to eat at Bobby Flay’s 6th restaurant in his budding empire. I enjoy the Food Network – not as a learning mechanism, but rather to salivate at the dishes being displayed. Chef Flay’s creations, to me, had always seemed down-to-earth but promised to be packed of flavours.

Five years later, during a brief return visit, my chance to dine at Mesa Grill was fulfilled. Moreover, this time we were staying at the Cove (one of the many buildings at Atlantis), so dining there was even easier since it was but steps from the elevator bank. The stars couldn’t align any better.

The restaurant is spacious with tables everywhere – which made it that much more surprising we weren’t able to secure reservations last time. Perhaps they saw me shivering from their over air conditioned lounge/waiting area or they knew I’d appreciate seeing action, but we ended up being seated at the table directly in front of kitchen. People were bustling and the stone pizza oven was ablaze adding some much needed warmth to the chilly restaurant.

On the advice of a friend, my husband and I both started with the crab and corn chowder ($12). He raved about it and warned it would be a dish that we wouldn’t want to share. Since we didn’t try other appetizers, it’d be hard to confirm it’s indeed the best starter. But, we both thoroughly enjoyed the soup and it was my favourite dish of the meal.


The corn puree base was sweet, thick and had just the right touch of creaminess to it. Clumps of crab meat were dotted throughout along with chives and tortilla chips to add crunch. But, it’s the drizzle of chilli oil atop everything that’s the most surprising, adding that kick that Chef Flay is known for. The complementary jalapeno corn bread and doughy bread knots were great for wiping up chowder remnants from the shallow dish.


After such a strong start our mains were disappointing in comparison. The sixteen spice chicken ($39), although tender, was much too tame for something promising sixteen spices. The dry rub really didn’t add much so most of the flavour came from the much too tangy tamarind barbecue sauce on the plate. As a saving grace, the bits of red cabbage and jicama slaw topping the chicken was delicious and could easily be made into a side dish for purchase.


The pan roasted shrimp ($45) would be a better choice with three huge prawns cooked nicely. The sweet corn puree on the bottom was also delicious but became overwhelmed by the smoked chile butter and cotija sauce. There was simply too much of this rich oversalted sauce that it covered the subtle sweetness of the shrimp and corn. In my opinion, the sauce would be better suited for the leaner chicken instead.


For sides, we shared the Southwestern fries ($9.50) and a sweet potato tamale ($9.50). The fries, although crispy and fresh, lacked anything special to classify them as “Southwestern” or warrant the price.


The sweet potato tamale ($9.50), albeit much too sweet for my liking, at least showed some creativity and skill. The tamale was smooth and flavourful, infused with corn kernels and topped with a crushed pecan butter sauce. You could even consider ordering this as a dessert as it was certainly sweet enough and satisfying.


Instead, my husband and I had the churros ($13) to share. It’s hard to go wrong with freshly deep fried dough dusted with sugar and spices. These were enjoyable by themselves or dipped into the chocolate sauce on the side. Thankfully, the star anise was only subtly added so the licorice flavour wasn’t too pronounced and went well with the sauce.


The service was efficient and friendly, but lacked the flair you’d expect for a restaurant classified as “fine dining”. If you were only going to have one nicer meal at Atlantis, I’d suggest Café Martinique instead. Prices are a touch higher but the dishes better executed (the duck was delicious) and the atmosphere more refined.

In the end, I’m happy I had the chance to try Mesa Grill and Chef Flay’s menu. But, as with most celebrity chef restaurants, too often you’re paying for the name rather than substance.

Overall mark - 6.5 out of 10

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____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!

CLOSED: Cava (Toronto)

Location: Toronto, Canada
Address: 1560 Yonge Street
Type of Meal: Dinner




Situated in a street level corridor of the St. Clair Centre, it’s not a location you’d expect to find a restaurant with Cava’s Spanish and Latin American flair. But, individuals certainly known about it given its busy dinner service on our week night visit. Their dining room is a stark contrast from the dimly lit corridor outside, as upon entering you’re greeted with clean blonde wood and tons of lighting.

With a fairly extensive tapas menu, there are a large number of choices and a particularly good vegetarian selection. We relied on the advice of Theran, our server, to narrow down our choices. His favourite dish is the pincho of Gamay-poached foie gras ($9), so we ordered one each given the small portion.

Generally, I’m not a big fan of foie gras (based on taste and ethical reasons), but decided to try it anyways given the hyped up dish. Thick slices of cool foie gras sit on a crisp crostini and is topped with a dollop of pear mostarda (similar to a chutney). The poached foie gras is one of the smoothest I’ve ever had with a consistency similar to a flourless chocolate torte.  As it melts in your mouth, your tongue is coated with rich flavour; but, before it becomes too overpowering the sweet mostarda cuts through and mellows everything out. If you like foie gras than this is a dish you need to try.


My friends really enjoyed the Spanish mackerel ceviche verde ($14) which is less tart than typical ceviches. Instead, the cilantro, fish and tomatillos (?) shine through, with the mixture tasting good on its own or with the fried tortillas accompanying it. For me, I found it a bit bland and would have liked more heat and citrus to counteract the oiliness from the tortilla chips.


The warm salad ($10) had some great vegetables in it - artichoke, piquillo pepper and oyster mushrooms. They are all grilled and dressed with a simple caper vinaigrette and sprinkled with cilantro. This is a hearty salad and good for the cold weather.


This dinner was the first time I’ve tried jamón Serrano ($16.50) and must admit that after having Ibérico is a bit of a disappointment, but you get what you pay for. The slices were too thick making them difficult to cut or chew. Overall, it was sort of tough – perhaps because the ham wasn’t well marbled – and doesn’t have that melt-in-your-mouth quality I enjoy with charcuterie.


Hands down my favourite dish of the night was the eggplant ($9.75). Wedges of eggplant are coated, deep fried and then cooked in a dish with tons of gooey queso fresco (cheese) and a tangy tomatillo sauce. Drizzles of honey and tons of bonito flakes top everything and just brings the dish together so well. It had a great combination of flavours and I could easily eat a whole plate of the eggplant with some crusty bread. You definitely have to try out this dish when you visit.


The roasted brussel sprouts ($8.95) were nice but pretty plain. Sure they were cooked well and had a nice caramelized crust to bring out its natural sweetness but they lacked a complementary flavour – the black garlic just didn’t really stand out.


To end we had a series of the more substantial small plates. The first was the grilled squid and zucchini ($15.75) in a romesco sauce (a hazelnut and red pepper blended puree). There was a fair amount of squid accompanying the dish, but could have benefited from a bit more time on the grill to give it a smokier crust. Although quite colourful, the romesco sauce wasn’t very strong; overall, it’s decent but lacked anything exciting.

                                                      
The grilled sea scallops ($23) were perfectly cooked so they were just cooked through and remained sweet and tender. The cauliflower puree was creamy and certainly had some butter in it. I love the addition of lentils to contrast the smooth puree, but wish they were softer.


Lastly, my friends wanted to try the veal sweetbreads ($23). Having only had a small piece of it once in my life, I knew it wasn’t horrible but was always under the impression it was calf brains. Turns out I was completely misinformed and sweetbreads is actually the thymus (throat) and pancreas of the animal. At Cava, Chef McDonald uses the thymus of the veal.  As with my first experience, it actually tastes pretty good (akin to a very tender piece of chicken with a denser pâté texture) but not something I’d order on a regular basis. Hats off to the chef for pairing it with a radicchio-poblano chile salad, which went so well adding a freshness against the heavy sweetbread.


To end, we shared a plate of churros con chocolate ($8). You really can’t go wrong with freshly fried pieces of dough dusted with sugar and served with hot melted dark chocolate. If the star anise was left out of the batter it would be even better; the licorice taste of the spice just isn’t something I like. But, once the luscious chocolate covers it, the flavour is thoroughly masked so not a deal breaker.


All in all, the food was good; our meal had some really great dishes and none were overly disappointing. But, the true highlight was the great service we received from Theran – friendly and approachable, attentive to our needs and so knowledgeable about Cava’s menu. However, I’d caution you to order a few dishes at a time and then order more if required. We ended up ordering too much and were stuffed by the time the scallops and sweetbread arrived. But, just make sure you order the eggplants, you’ll thank me for it later.

Overall mark - 7.5 out of 10


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____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!