Arthur's Restaurant (Toronto)

One of my pet peeves is when restaurants present a terrible table despite me having a long-standing reservation. Because of this, my first impression of Arthur’s was already soured as after placing a reservation 3-weeks prior, I wasn’t lead into the dining room, instead seated in a booth beside the bar where it was noisy and chaotic as staff members picked up drinks and entered/exited the bar. In my books, bar seating should be held for walk-ins or those who specifically request it.

To make matters worse, the table hadn’t been cleaned since the last guests vacated so water rings and small sticky spots were still visible upon seating. And despite its proximity to alcohol, there wasn’t even a wine list presented. Let’s just say Arthur’s isn’t good at making first impressions.

While both our appetizers were essentially fish spreads, in reality they tasted very different. Immediately, in catching a whiff of the smokiness from the smoked fish spread ($16.95), I was drawn to it. And if it weren’t so salty, this could have been a great dish – there were ample chunks of fish, the spread had a great consistency, and the pickled onion garnish a great compliment.


Maybe if they provided more everything bagel chips the ratio of spread to bread would have been better, rendering the dish less salty. As it stood, even after loading up the crackers we didn’t get through half the dip.

Adding other items to put the spread on would also be smart as I found the smoked fish worked better with the gem lettuce leaves that accompanied the tuna tartare ($22.95) as it helped calm down the over seasoned spread. Meanwhile, the fresh but relatively mild tartare benefited from being accompanied by the bagel chips, which were saltier and added a crunch against the soft tartare.


Having had two seafood appetizers, meats were in store for the mains. The cheeseburger ($20.95) was done medium and a nice combination of the traditional garnishes. While it’s a decent burger, the beef patty was too dense (I prefer my burgers releasing a bit of juice and fat on bite) and the bun wasn’t the freshest.


The pastrami on rye ($22.05) is so heavy that you really don’t need any of the additional condiments. The bread is dipped in butter and grilled before sandwiching hefty slices of pastrami. I can see where the chef was going with the creation – pairing crispy oily bread against the relatively lean meat. But, being so oily makes it difficult to move between sandwich and wine glass (a warm wet towel may help keep the mess at bay). Plus, the greasiness and extra calories really didn’t add to the experience of the sandwich.


Having been to so many of the other Chase Hospitality Group’s restaurants (Chase, Planta, Kasa Moto), Arthur’s was by far the worst experience. Poor hosting choices and a dirty table aside, being seated at the bar also meant service was lackluster and we had to flag down servers on their way to the bar to place orders and get our bill.

If Chase thinks having less competition Midtown means they can throw pretty paint on a dining room (but not seat everyone in it) and call themselves a restaurant, there are tons of better options even within the same building (Cava for one). The only saving grace for the evening was the great conversations and companionship at the table. Arthur’s itself didn’t impress.

Overall mark - 5 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 12 St. Clair Avenue East

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Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


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Arthur's Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Louix Louis (Toronto)


In the aftermath of the Trump presidency, Toronto’s tower lost the blue and red stripes and rebranded to become the St. Regis Hotel. The flagship restaurant located on the 31st floor also morphed from America to something much more colonial - Louix Louis.

In line with their name, the menu is a mix of English and French offerings. On the French end, the croque Madame ($18) arrives as a thick piece of toast topped with ham, poached egg, and gruyere smothered in a cream sauce that looks more decadent than it tastes. The bread could be thinner and could use a few extra minutes in the pan. As it stands, it covers all the elements and the cheese inside isn’t even melted.


The English version of the main, the eggs benedict ($24), was executed better despite not being on the ‘Signatures’ section of the menu. Diners are given a choice of smoked salmon, pea meal bacon, or creamy spinach to include in the traditional recipe of English muffin, poached egg and hollandaise. With the thicker slab of pea meal, the main is tastier but really no different from most benny offerings.


With nary a potato accompanying anything, there was room for bressert (breakfast dessert… get it)? Personally I found the brioche French toast ($18) a bit dry, but I’ve been spoilt by really good French toast that gets soaked in the egg bath so the bread tastes like a thick custard. Louix Louis does include a variety of condiments - whipped mascarpone, blueberries and toasted almond – to make sure it’s at least flavourful.


The buttermilk pancakes ($18) were fluffier and served thinly so that a toasted flavour permeates the pancake. Topped with bourbon and caramelized apple chutney, the condiments were a nice touch and went nicely smothered with maple syrup.


For the most part, the restaurant feels the same with the impressive finishes and soaring ceiling in the dining room. But, like the old vs. new world differences there are signs of wear. Their bathrooms are no longer gleaming and opulent feeling; the walls in the stalls are marked with holes and a sad handwritten ‘out of order’ sign is placed on one of the toilets. Even the service is slow and tiresome – it takes a reminder and over 15 minutes before tea arrives (for something that’s boiling water and a tea bag). If you’re thirsty you better ask for the water upfront as it’ll never arrive otherwise.


So while the classic breakfast options at Louix Louis are good, the whole experience lacks the luxurious poise you’d expect from a luxury hotel. Trump has left the building, but St. Regis needs to step up their game.

Overall mark - 6 out of 10



How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 325 Bay Street (in the St. Regis Hotel)

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____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


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Louix Louis Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato


HuTaoLi Music Restaurant & Bar 胡桃里音乐酒馆 (Markham)


Let’s just say HuTaoLi Music Restaurant and Bar is unlike any Chinese restaurant I’ve ever been to. There’s flora sprouting from the ceiling and trinkets galore. I almost feel like I’m entering a brighter version of Rainforest Cafe minus the massive animals.

Yet, things feel rushed. The dishes come out way too quickly, so take it from me and order in waves. Otherwise, it's impossible to fit everything on the table and the enjoyment level starts depleting as you scramble to divide everything onto the side plates, only to have to scarf it down to make room for more.

From what I can remember, the sliced beef and tongue in chili ($9.99) actually contains beef tongue and tripe, thinly sliced so it’s tender and sits in a flavourful oil that’s spicy but not overwhelming. If offal makes you squeamish, the lotus root with special chili sauce ($6.99) offers a similar flavour and a great refreshing crunch.


Probably one of their most photographed dishes is the house special roast chicken ($16.99), which arrives with a lot of glitz – the chicken sitting in a wooden bird cage, the top opened with a flourish. As great as it looks, it’s really just deep fried crispy chicken in a much smaller and disheveled format. At least it’s a good rendition of the dish, the meat moist but cooked through and the skin crispy.


Their spicy stir-fried shrimps ($18.99) deserves more credit with its generous portion allowing there to be plenty to split amongst a table. It’s another powerful tasting dish, especially if you dig to the bottom and get pieces of the numbing Sichuan peppers.


HuTaoLi has some really interesting options like the durian pizza ($17.99) where the fruit adds an element of sweetness against the salty cheese and really works. The durian’s aroma isn’t too strong but is definitely present and actually meld nicely with the cheesy essence. Overall, it’s a surprisingly tasty dish, if only they swapped out the store bought pre-made pizza crust with an oven-toasted version that’s thinner, chewier and crispier… this would be a dish to contend with.


Others didn’t work quite as well like the Spanish style roasted rice with squid ink ($22.99). Really, other than the shallow iron pan it arrives in, it’s nothing like paella. The rice is darkly coloured but there’s no ink flavour. I can only describe the pineapple chunks topping the rice as strange and mildly off-putting. It’s a dish, which for me, really really doesn’t work.


I’d much rather have the simple things like the stewed mixed vegetable ($10.99), where HuTaoLi incorporates daikon and cucumber for a bit of crunch. With all the other heavier dishes, it was really nice to have something fresh to balance the meal. 


Switch out the Spanish style roasted rice for the brown sugar crispy rice cake ($7.99) instead. What a fantastic dessert incorporating sticks of chewy glutinous rice that has a light crunchy crust. The brown sugar syrup adds just enough sweetness but keeps things light enough that I could have downed an order to myself.


HuTaoLi’s main draw is, of course, the live music. This starts after 6:45pm when a soloist takes the stage crooning Mandarin songs while playing the piano. We heard that later in the evening a band takes the stage and 9pm onwards the place turns into a bar.


Since it’s located in Markham, someone will likely need to drive. Luckily, HuTaoLi has a decent non-alcoholic drink selection, the mango pineapple coconut juice ($7.99) refreshing and tasty to sip on while listening to music.



If only there was more time in the evening to really take everything in and enjoy yourself. Amongst the flora wonderland and soulful ballads, it’s a place where you want to stay and really enjoy yourself. Too bad the rushed service emits a pressured feeling to pay and get out. Even though HuTaoLi offers live music, but it sure doesn’t feel like a music bar.  

Overall mark - 7 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Markham, Canada
 Address: 3760 Highway 7 East

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____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


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Hutaoli 胡桃里音乐酒馆 Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Selam Vegan Restaurant (Toronto)


Walk too quickly and you’ll like breeze by Selam as it occupies the basement of Pero restaurant. The only telltale sign of their shared space is their small signage by the door. Like its sister restaurant, Selam offers Ethiopian cuisine, except their menu is entirely vegan and most things are also gluten free, which makes the restaurant an excellent choice for dining with a group with varying dietary restrictions.

Although there are options to build your own platter, with larger groups, sharing family style is a fresher alternative. Amongst our table of six people, we shared seven items are were stuffed. As a lover of split pea soup, Selam’s version of the main was thicker ($10) and oh so hearty. Enhanced with a bit of curry and turmeric, the spices were lightly added more for colour and a depth in flavour.


For a bit of heat, the spicy eggplant ($10) and red lentil ($12) were both great choices – the latter having the most kick. Maybe it’s me, but I always love a good stewed eggplant, especially when it gets nice and soft and soaks in all the fragrant spices. It just goes so well with the injera ($3 for three pieces) as the sauce gets trapped in the spongy crevices or spooned over plain white rice ($3).


For something interesting, try the flax firfir ($10), which mixes flax seed with gluten free injera to form a dish that’s not saucy but rather eats like a savoury bread pudding. It’s an acquired taste - our table was split on its tastiness.  


With all the heavier stews, orders of the kale ($10) with garlic and ginger and okra ($12) with green onions and chili flakes were perfect to help add some crunch and freshness to an otherwise hearty meal. Selam’s kale is definitely not boring and chopped so finely that you can mix it into some of the saucier dishes to change the texture.


You definitely need a bunch of choices to keep the meal interesting. Rest assured, with smaller tables, Selam offers combination plates mixing 3 or 4 items or there’s also a $18 buffet, which has almost all the items from the menu.


While Selam’s food was tasty, the basement jazz club atmosphere was a bit strange. Moreover, while I understand their desire to showcase Ethiopian coffee, as the roasting beans were brought around, the low ceiling dining room filled with smoke and a nauseatingly strong smell of frankincense.  It’s a smell that just sticks and lingers, detracting from the otherwise delicious meal. In my opinion, skip the beans, and bring on the eggplant.

Overall mark - 6.5 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 812 Bloor Street West (basement)

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____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


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Good In Every Grain Dinner


Let’s face it. I could never join the keto craze. Eliminating carbohydrates and not eating delicious bread and pasta? No thank you. Hence, when the Grain Farmers of Ontario threw their first of a series of Crop Up dinners to feature the bounty – barley, corn, oats, soybeans, and wheat – they were preaching to the converted.

It was an evening of discovery. Firstly, realizing that tucked behind Bar Raval was Woodlot, a small cozy restaurant. With their rustic décor and wood-fired oven, it was a smartly chosen venue to showcase grains. After all, they already make sourdough bread on site to serve during dinner – the kitchen knows their stuff. A piece of crusty bread with butter … see why I can never go keto?


Chef Mike explained the premise of the menu: to keep things simple and let the grains speak for themselves. The salad was hearty using large chunks of roasted beets that were lightly cooked so that it still retained a slight bite. An herbed barley lay beneath to soak up the beet juices, but it’s such a versatile side that it’d work equally well with meaty or saucier dishes. Topping the salad was a soy nut and sunflower crumble, giving it some crunch – almost like a really flavourful nutty crouton.


Most guests were presented with a mammoth lamb shank, but being a flexitarian during the week, I was treated to a vegetarian main: confit white turnip stuffed with oats, green onion, dandelion and pistachio then cooked in their wood-burning oven and glazed in a surprisingly savoury apricot glaze. With all the roasted vegetables on the side, it was certainly a vibrant and healthy dish. But, I must admit… I was jealous for the lamb shank (note to self: go back to Woodlot on a weekend).


With all the plentiful hearty dishes, it was a shame I couldn’t finish the corn flour chiffon cake… it was just so large! Despite being thick, it was fairly fluffy and the sweetness of the corn was augmented with vanilla and a light touch of lavender. The blueberry compote and chamomile lemon curd were both not overpowering. Chef Mike was true to his word – I could enjoy the natural flavours of the ingredients.


Of course, there were educational aspects to the evening like introducing the Grain Farmers of Ontario and explaining their representation of over 28,000 farmers in Ontario. I also learnt that not all wheat is the same and depending on the farm’s soil different flours are grown – Ontario wheat is largely used for pastry flours.

What made the evening special was there were farmers in attendance. It provided the opportunity for discussions and they very candidly answered our questions.

So, it was nice to learn the personal stories. Both individuals I spoke to grew up on their family farms and when starting their own families purchased land near their parents, which is how a lot of businesses expand. You can hear the passion in their voices and the burning desire to ensure the survival of the family farm. Indeed, they admit, that like any other business, they have to operate economically. Yet, they have to ensure their practices are sustainable since the farm is also where their families live and eat and the asset they want to pass to generations to come.


In an era of change, it wasn’t surprising to hear the comment that a well-educated farmer is paramount for ensuring the farm survives. As families shrink, they also need to rely on technology to help manage the hundreds of acre of land. Big data and satellite imaging to create a map for variable fertilizer application – is Google Farm a thing?

What I didn’t except was the frankness on some the less rosy aspects of farming, such as the mental health issues some farmers face. It’s a stressful industry where so much of their livelihood is dependent on weather (their favourite topic) and politics (their second favourite topic). With the low margins, a bout of extreme weather can have devastating financial impacts.


A lot of work needs to be done, especially at the beginning of the season, so lack of sleep and burnout can augment the stress and anxiety. The humanity of the profession was sadly not something I thought about previously, but was glad for the opportunity to break bread over dinner to have these conversations. We often take for granted the humble grain and the nourishment they provide. It’s nice to be reminded that behind all the grains, there’s are families of farmers, who have passion, stresses and dreams like everyone else. 

Disclaimer: The above meal was complimentary. Rest assured, as noted in my mission statement, I will always provide an honest opinion.


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 293 Palmerston Avenue 

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Dinner With a View (Toronto)


If you asked me 5 years ago if I’d like to eat dinner under the Gardiner Expressway, a look of confusion and an adamant no would have followed. Yet, the underpass space is undergoing a revitalization, starting with this winter when it was transformed into a skating trail. Now that the ice has finally melted, a small portion of the space near Fort York plays host to Dinner With a View.

Let’s start with the latter half of the title - With a View. As you first arrive, it’s an underwhelming feeling when you find the view consists of black gauze and the metal and concrete highway. But once you settle into one of the domes ($149 and seats from 4-6 people) you start to get into the spirit.


The décor and furniture vary in the domes. As I relaxed into the comfortable wooden chair (which felt like I was getting a hug) and pulled a blanket over my legs, that feeling of experiencing something different added a sense of excitement. Interestingly, the cozy enclosure makes the dinner feel intimate, but being able to peer out into the Bentway also ensures you don’t feel claustrophobic.


I just wish they didn’t keep harping on how the items within the dome weren’t complimentary and that staff members conduct an inventory count before and after the meal. Were guests really pilfering the pots of fake plants? Way to ruin the experience.

Now the first part of the title – Dinner. After reserving a dome, guests are required to select a dinner option (additional $99 per person) within 48 hours and can choose between meat, fish and vegan mains.

Let’s just say you don’t come for the food. The quinoa salad with ranch dressing was something I could have easily whipped up myself. Moreover, the random boring garnishes thrown in – chickpeas, pitted black olives, and frisee – felt like someone was cleaning out their fridge and decided to throw a bunch of ingredients together. Seriously, is it that difficult to at least roast some beets?  


I left hungry as the paltry portion of whitefish (with many soft bones left in) barely made a dent in my appetite. Sure, they could skimp on the protein but at least load-up the plate with more sides (slivers of mushroom, turnip puree, and roasted vegetables). At the very least, give out a bread basket. Note, the beef is slightly larger – although my friends complained it was too salty.


Dessert was a minor improvement with a fancy sounding rosemary vanilla crème brûlée topped with pear tuille. While the actual dish didn’t resemble the name – there was no brûlée and somehow the rosemary was chocolate instead. At least it tasted decent.


I’m sure Chef René Rodriguez tried his best with the challenging outdoor conditions. But, the meal was a flop. They should really stop touting his accolade of being a Canada’s Top Chef winner. I’ve had better meals attending conferences.

Nevertheless, our 7:30pm dinner was the perfect seating – at the start there’s plenty of sunlight so you’re able to navigate easily into the dome; we’re treated to the descending sun for the first half of the meal; and after it gets dark, the lighting and illuminated domes creates a dazzling back drop. I loved the night-time experience and couldn’t believe the one and half hours was over … I didn’t want to leave and felt like I could party all night. You’re definitely here for the experience, not the food.


I can’t finish this post without correcting a piece of fake news – no homeless people were forced to vacate the site to make room for the domes. During the opening weekend of the dinner, OCAP made a lot of fuss that a homeless camp was demolished and people were evicted in preparation for the event. In reality, that camp was located 2km away and the City of Toronto removed the tents for safety reasons; over the winter fires have broken out killing people in the process.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not disputing there’s a growing homeless problem in the city. It’s a visible issue that’s not only confined to downtown Toronto and something that has to be addressed. What I can’t agree with is how OCAP reacted to the event. Instead of protesting something that supports the Bentway and adds tax dollars into system, they could have approached the organizers to donate a portion of the proceeds to their cause or alternatively set-up a booth outside to raise awareness and solicit donations.

In a city where there’s a growing divide between the rich and the poor, do we really want to make the chasm even larger? Instead of pointing fingers and throwing insults, wouldn’t it be better to work together to enact positive change? 


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 250 Fort York Boulevard

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Laissez Faire (Toronto)


You do you … the modern day equivalent to living a laissez faire lifestyle. It’s a romantic thought, being able to live as you please, be as you please - and at the new Laissez Faire – eat as you please. Their menu strays from their French name and also offers Italian dishes for good measure.

It’s not always done well, the porcini truffle arancini ($13) are the worst I’ve ever had: the risotto so dry that the ball starts to crumble and the mixture bland so everything relies heavily on the marinara (thankfully, fresh and delicious). As a plus, since it is deep fried rice, even being the worst it’s still edible, but certainly not one you’d want to serve a true Italian.


The squid ink tagliatelli ($21) is 100% better. Dark ribbons of pasta encompasses a seafood flavour but not in a fishy way. It’s covered in a sauce that’s not overly thick but salty enough to really give it a briny sea essence. Plump sweet clams and crunchy bread crumb provide a nice contrast to the pasta, while there’s just enough dill fronds to add a hint of freshness without morphing the dish’s earthiness.


Safer sharing plates are some of the cold seafood options. While we weren’t advised what the oysters were that evening (only that they were from PEI), the dozen ($32) tasted clean and fresh, accompanied with the traditional vinegary onion mignonette and grated horseradish. 


Meanwhile, the albacore tuna ($17) has a real nuttiness from the black and white sesame crust. It’s slowly seared so the seeds are just lightly toasted and the tuna wrapped in a thin cooked ring and warmed through. Really swipe the fish around the plate to get all the herby aioli on the plate.

For something incredible, you have to be willing to dive all-in … calories and cholesterol be damn! Just bite into the pork belly ($17) and enjoy the crispy skin that’s the perfect ratio of fat for flavours and skin for chewiness. A thin sherry gastrique and bits of pomegranate add a slight sweetness against the otherwise savoury dish. It’s so good that a table of four may want to double the order so you can each have another piece.


The duck confit ($21) was another strong dish with the traditional crunchy skin encapsulating soft rich meat. Pairing the fowl with salad was a great idea to keep it lighter and allows a diner to still enjoy some starters.


Aside from the food, two things really stuck out for me. Firstly, the odd portion sizes at Laissez Faire. While the small and large plates weren’t overly big, the sides like roasted Brussels sprouts and parsnips ($14) were massive. Who knows, maybe it’s their way of making diners eat their vegetables. Yet, there’s so much bacon incorporated into the dish that vegetables seem secondary. Moreover, the sauce is way too sweet and the pickled mustard seeds, while a great idea, needs to be applied with a lighter touch. Maybe it’s me, but I want my vegetables to actually taste like vegetables.


Portion sizes were wonky in the dessert department as well. The apple tarte tatin ($11) is barely sharable compared to the brioche panna cotta ($14), which actually resembles a regular-sized dessert.

Nevertheless, both are decent – the apple tatin served as a deconstructed version consisting of well-poached apples with a thinned caramel sauce on top of a piece of really buttery pastry. The flavours are bang on, just the form was a bit disappointing as I was actually hoping for the traditional tarte format. The panna cotta has the requisite creamy texture with a strong vanilla flavour. I could have done without the bits of crunchy brioche crumbles, which takes away from that lovely silky texture; yet, I can see some liking the contrasting texture and hint of saltiness it adds to the dessert.


The second thing that stuck with me, albeit I didn’t realize until I was writing the blog post, was how wildly inaccurate the prices charged for the desserts were from the published amounts. On the menu, it’s listed as $9 for the apple tarte tatin and $11 for the panna cotta, while what’s actually charged is $11 and $14, respectively. Perhaps a $1 difference is reasonable when there’s a last minute change, but to add $3 to each dish is terribly inconsistent. Sadly, the caliber and size of the desserts definitely aren’t worth the augmented price.

Maybe it all comes back to the laissez faire attitude – who cares if prices are incorrectly charged, the Italian dishes aren’t necessarily the strongest, or the sides are the same size as mains? Just go with it and pop another bottle of bubbly to forget about the situation – oddly, we did end up getting a BOGO 50% off deal for the Prosecco without realizing it. After all, it all works out in the end… just chill out.

Overall mark - 7.5 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 589 King Street West

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog
____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


Is That It? I Want More!

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