Showing posts with label Spanish. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Spanish. Show all posts

Labora (Toronto)


In the evenings, the back of Campo Food Hall transforms into Labora, a tapas restaurant. With the rest of the stalls closed, there’s a sense of calm as you enter the space, like walking through a short alley to get to the restaurant.

While Labora isn’t as laid back as a small shop in Barcelona, it does have a casual vibe, which is why when our waiter asked if we like olives (before we glanced at the menu), my husband answered yes (even though I’m impartial to them). Soon a large plate of them arrived with a $7 charge to match. I’ve dined in countries where a snack charge is added to everyone’s bill. Usually, this means a plate is already sitting on the table and the menu generally calls out the cost. To have someone ask if you like olives, like if you want bread, and then charge you for it feels misleading.


Maybe if it was only $3 (and a smaller portion) it would be less noticeable. What arrives is a sizeable plate with four different types of olives marinated in citrus so makes it less pungent and almost sweet. As olives go, these aren’t bad. Just not my first choice for adding to the meal.

A dish like the Joselito lomo ($13.50) is what I would have preferred to snack on with beer. Sourced from an Iberico pig, it’s cut from the loin instead of the leg, so the meat is leaner but still melts on the tongue and has that lightly salted sweetness found in jamon. It’s also a good introduction to Iberico products, if you’re not sure if you want to shell out $30 for jamon.


The menu describes the pan tumaca ($6) as tomato rubbed ‘Cristal’ bread. What is Cristal bread? From what I deduced, the moniker likely references all the air pockets formed in the well-toasted airy bread that’s drenched with olive oil and so crunchy, it tastes deep fried. The thin layer of tomato paste is rather neutral, most of the flavours stem from the olive oil.


For something spicy, the bocata del calamari ($9.50 each) will have you reaching for a cerveza. Rings of lightly dusted deep-fried calamari are sandwiched in a brioche bun with tons of aioli, drizzled in hot sauce, and a pickled pepper is skewered through the squid. The pepper adds a juicy freshness to the sandwich but with the siracha was really spicy. Luckily, you can always pull it out and take small bites to temper the spice. The sandwich was delicious and one of my favourite dishes of the evening.


Another was the rubia gallega ($19.50) a cured Ontario ribeye that’s prepared like Iberico, thinly sliced then topped with honey mushrooms and truffle oil. The truffle oil was a bit overpowering when eating the beef on its own, but with crostini the flavours balance out. What a genius idea to use ribeye as the protein, the cut has enough fat for that lusciousness, like ham, and lends itself to taking on the lightly sweetened flavour.


After some heavier dishes the tumet ($19) was a welcomed contrast. The oven-roasted terrine made with thinly sliced zucchini, eggplant, and potato was a fairly big portion. Aside from the potato, the other vegetables became lost in the thick zesty tomato sauce so more of the zucchini and eggplant would make this even better.


Some dishes could have been good if only there wasn’t one overpowering ingredient added. Sometimes it just pays to keep it simple with seasonings like oil and salt.

The BC striped shrimp pintxos ($16), a special for the evening, takes the tiny shrimp and lines them onto whipped roe on toasted bread. These ingredients would have been more than enough: the roe salty with a rich seafood essence; the shrimp a little sweetness; and there’s even chives, adding a taste of the herb and colour. But then, a liberal sprinkling of paprika is added, completely overpowering the shrimp and giving a slightly bitter finish to the dish. 



Similarly, the sour grapefruit used in the serviola crudo ($18.40) covered the delicate yellow tail tuna. Maybe it has something to do with our waiter urging us to spoon the marinating liquid over everything, to get the coffee flavours. 


In all fairness, our waiter was extremely friendly and warm, I know he was just trying to make sure we had the best experience possible. However, I couldn’t taste any coffee and the sour grapefruit so pungent I coughed. Alas, the poor tuna no match for the citrus. 

Overall mark - 7 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 433 King Street West (in the Campo Food Hall)

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog
____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


Is That It? I Want More!

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Edulis (Toronto)


Edulis is quaint. Walk too quickly and you may miss their storefront; the neighbourhood doesn’t feel like where one of Toronto’s best restaurants would be found. Tables are closely situated throughout the dining room, the dim candlelight some respite for privacy between you and neighbours. 

Upon entering the homey looking bathroom, I felt like I met a kindred spirit: framed all along the walls were tasting menus from notable restaurants! There were so many to read through … the November 2014 menu from Alinea (close to the time I visited the restaurant) and an interesting peeky toe crab from Daniel’s menu that peaked my interest. I almost felt bad; with only one stall, I was surely taking too long in the bathroom.

My only complaint for the evening is the actual ordering process. Edulis’ menu is short and sweet, but somehow turns into a five minute affair for our waitress to explain all the changes we can make. Some are additions (where you get another dish) while others a supplement (that replaces an existing one). By the end, I was a bit confused and tired; certainly it could all be simplified? Worst of all, you almost feel pressured to add something on, so it seems like Edulis’ regular menu would be insufficient, when it can certainly stand on its own.

What turned out to be my least favourite dish of the meal was the hors of d'oeuvre of imperial osetra caviar ($50) we added onto the meal (although my husband loved it). To me, the caviar was really fishy until you ate it with enough of the cream sauce. Moreover, the so call “caviar” wooden spoons we were given (since metal alters the ingredient’s taste) were much too thick to actually scoop up the delicate caviar without the help of fingertips. Where was the thin oyster of pearl ones that makes it so much easier?

In terms of the standard menu, Edulis presents two options: a smaller 5-course for $65 or 7-courses for $85 (per person). Understandably, the whole table has to order the same number of courses, but our waitress explains the seven course version isn’t that much larger as the two additional dishes tend to be smaller in size. Unfortunately, they can’t provide any description of what the menu could be given what’s served can change throughout the night depending on availability … talk about just-in-time inventory management.

The 7-course menu ($85) began with a simple bite-sized pintxo combining a large green olive and toasted bread drizzled with olive oil. It set the tone and reminded diners that they were in a Spanish restaurant with bold tastes to come. A larger basket of country style bread also arrived and we were warned not to fill up on it – we heeded the warning and took only a couple of bites. Nonetheless, the bread basket depleted by the end - the sauces were so good that we had to mop up every drop.


Take the light onion sauce accompanying the Nova Scotia tuna, which was served raw with crunchy seaweed cucumber, the sauce helped give a lovely essence to the fish without relying on the typical citrus or soy. What a refreshing bite that lightly stings the tongue, every bit of sauce was devoured.


The following lobster was delicately poached so it was just cooked through; still holding a bit of its translucence. Nonetheless, it was cooked and the natural sweetness shone through. Incorporating fava beans and crushed almonds, there was plenty of differing textures to the plate. The ajo blanco sauce is garlicky with a hint of citrus and a creamy finish – great against the lobster and for dipping bread.


Normally, a dish that’s lukewarm would be a turnoff, but the room temperature rabbit terrine actually was quite nice against the cool foam. Since it wasn’t too hot, the meaty terrine wasn’t a shock against the cool silky foie gras. Meanwhile, the Saskatchewan chanterelles added a great light earthy essence and the white asparagus shavings and pine nuts a bit of crunch against everything. 


My first time having triglidae, or as Edulis described it as “sea robin”, I can see how this fish gets its moniker. Although it looks like a typical white fish, the meat was intensely dense so it seemed like flaky chicken - sounds weird but actually quite tasty. Along with sliced summer squash, a squash blossom, and diced squash mixed into the sauce, the dish was light and refreshing. The sauce was predominantly olive oil and tomato based augmented with a hint of citrus, while the fresh oregano went nicely with the acid in the dish … how I wanted more!


Wild Nunavut arctic char is supposedly a rare fish that can only be sourced twice in the year – a lucky coincidence we could sample it that evening. Compared to traditional Arctic char, this was leaner so a bit stronger in flavour without the hint of oil on the tongue. Of course, the beany sauce was fantastic and there was so much of it that I finished it off like soup.


The last savoury course is also the sole non-seafood dish, a dry-aged duck breast and braised duck leg that evening. Despite not having an ounce of crispy skin, the duck was nonetheless cooked wonderfully and had us savouring its simple flavours and natural juices. The roasted baby turnips were sweet against the savoury duck gravy and herby salsa verde. All in all, it was a rich and hearty ending compared to the other lighter dishes.  


After all these years, why is Edulis still one of the hardest restaurants to score a reservation to? Simply put, their food is fantastic! Their sauces can rival any French restaurant and for me tastes even better: despite having some butter and cream within the sauces, they’re well balanced so you get the silky rich mouth feel without the heaviness. Meanwhile, the proteins are kept simple and just cooked through (nothing was tough or dry), allowing it to compliment and not compete with the sauce. Moreover, the dishes generally have a number of textures so there’s often a pop of crunch, but done subtly so it doesn’t overpower the plate.

If you aren’t able to get a reservation, the restaurant does have a few tables on a covered patio, customers can’t order the tasting menu but are able to enjoy drinks and create their own cheeseboard from a large array Edulis carries.

The dessert was a raspberry mousse and sorbet with nuts. At first, I wasn’t overly excited – sorbet is so boring – but the flavours were, once again, well controlled so the sorbet wasn't too sweet or tart and the mousse not rendered into a sugary gelatin. I certainly could taste the fruit and the dessert had an almost Creamsicle finish.


Just when we resigned that it was all over, we’re brought over a rum baba with Chantilly cream. The server proceeds to drench the cake in a warm butter rum sauce and we're advised add some cream to each bite. Wow, what a great combination: first a hit of alcoholic rum, which is balanced out by the sweet cool cream and finishes with a slight saltiness from the sauce. What a lovely indulgent ending! I only wished they didn’t take away what little remained from the bread so we could soak up the rest of the rum butter sauce.


As I mentioned previously, Edulis is quaint. The small dining room can hold about thirty guests and the meal progresses slowly so you’ll be there for over three hours (although it doesn’t feel that long). Hence, I can see why it’s hard to get a reservation: they don’t try to churn multiple seating of guests through in an evening. With every course I wanted even more, anxiously waiting to see what the kitchen would come up with next. All the while, the wine continues to pour and the twinkling candles have a relaxing effect. All to enjoy one more bite of sauce-laden bread. 

Overall mark - 9.5 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 169 Niagara Street

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog
____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


Is That It? I Want More!

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Edulis Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Simply Snacking: Espuña Tapas Essentials


The culture of sharing little bites is everywhere in the world: the French pass around hors d’oeuvres, Italians have antipasto, and Chinese families love dim sum. In Spain, they’re known as tapas, a selection of cold or hot dishes often eaten as a snack but could be combined into a meal. While travelling in Barcelona, they were a wonderful pick-me-up after hours of sightseeing to refill on nutrients and cool down with beer or sangria.

Sometimes tapas are purchased, but the simpler versions are offered on a complimentary basis with drinks. In fact, the practice began when bread or meat slices were given out to patrons at taverns to cover their glasses and keep out the blowing sand from dirt roads. The meats also tend to be saltier to encourage drinking and higher alcohol sales.  


This year, Espuña Tapas Essentials is crossing the ocean and entering the Canadian market. Currently found in Longo’s Market stores, they offer a variety of 18 sliced meats and heat-and-serve products. As an introduction I received a selection of products to try and invited friends over to sample them over wine – luckily my home wasn’t overly dusty as there’s no way these meats would cover the large wine glasses we use nowadays.

Directly translated as “mountain” ham, the Serrano ham used to be cured in sheds in high altitudes. Delicious on its own, I also enjoyed the ham on toasted bread brushed with olive oil with lightly aged white cheddar. The heat of the bread starts to warm through the cheese and softens the thin layers of fat on the Serrano ham to give the tapa a creamy feel.

If you like your charcuterie fattier (especially when pairing with beer), Espuña has a whole line of salamis. The Barcelona style (on the left in the picture below) is less blubbery and seasoned longer to really allow the salt and pepper to permeate the meat. The longer curing period also makes the pork dryer and a tad gamier than your typical salami.


Meanwhile, the original Olat salami (in the middle in the picture above) originates from the founder’s region, in the North Eastern part of Spain. Larger chunks of fatty pork is stuffed into a thin casing and seasoned again. A little greasy for my tastes, but was the salami my husband happily inhaled.

If you’re in the mood for a real salty snack, the chorizo cañitas takes pepperettes to the next level. Like its name, the cañita is thin and long like a “drinking straw”; Espuña even suggests you serve them standing up in a glass with breadsticks.

For me, since the soft pork was so well-seasoned with salt and paprika, I found the cañitas were best consumed in small pieces tucked into a soft piece of bread. Use them for a quick omelette: dice one cañita into small pieces, mix into two beaten eggs, and cook! You don’t even need to add any salt and pepper, making it one of the quickest breakfasts I’ve ever made.

The heat and serve line is ingenious for making tapas that could transform into a hearty meal. After removing from the packaging and a quick minute in the microwave, I was presented with juicy aromatic meat skewers with chopped fine herbs and a sweet and salty bacon wrapped dates. These are great for dinner parties, especially since they can be prepared in small batches to provide guests with a hot treat. 


When Esteve Espuña first started making sausages in a farmhouse near Olot, little did he know that his creations would eventually be eaten worldwide. Thanks to his family member’s working to expand the brand, I’ve received a taste of Spain in Canada. Mix with fresh bread, a selection of cheeses and grilled vegetables, their creations really allowed for a satisfying spread with friends. 

Disclaimer: The above snacks were provided on a complimentary basis. Rest assured, as noted in the mission statement, I would never promote something I didn't actually enjoy.


MORE: Back to Simply Snacking

How To Find Them 
 Website: http://www.espunatapasessentials.ca/ or Longo's
 Approx. Price:  $2.99 - $6.99

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog

Bar Raval (Toronto)



Bar Raval Toronto

Never did I think I’d knowingly pay to eat canned goods. But, that’s the Grant van Gameren magic: he makes canned food sexy, so people wait to eat it and pay top dollar. Of course, the ones served at Bar Raval are imported from Spain and said to be top quality, not the Chicken of the Sea variety.

We tried a half order of white clams ($20) and they were slightly salty with an essence of the sea – though Grant’s magic still didn’t transform College Street into Majorca for me.


Plain kettle chips accompanied the clams, which seemed like a strange combination. But after popping one on a chip and adding a splash of hot sauce, the crunch of the chip against the soft clam was quite good. Overall, the clams weren’t rubbery or mushy (as I feared) and tasted as fresh as canned could be. Nonetheless, they weren’t fantastic either, I’d still rather stick with the fresh ones.

The boquerones ($9) are deboned anchovies marinated in vinegar and olive oil. The acidness would pair well with a beer’s bitterness, but with my bubbly cava it didn’t have the same effect - the cava overtook the delicateness of the fish. Moreover, after experiencing the saltiness of the clams and chip, the dish ended feeling much plainer. Having ordered a side of bread ($1.90), it would have gone great with the fish as a make-your-own pinxtos, but it didn’t arrive until later.


The soft chewy bread was instead paired with the thin slices of presa iberica ($11). Being from the leaner shoulder cut of the pig, it isn’t as melt-in-your-mouth as the jamon variety. Nonetheless, it’s flavourful with a sweetness that’s mixed into the cured meat and the light film that sticks to your tongue is wonderful, so you can taste it even after the pork is gone. This dish is a great deal with plenty of slices to go around.


A cross between ceviche and carpaccio, the Galician octopus ($8) is a refreshing summery dish. Served room temperature, the octopus slices arrive with a vinegar, paprika and oil mixture with diced pickles (?) on top. There’s still a bite to the octopus that makes the dish perfect to munch and graze on.


For a more substantial dish, the whole squid ($15) done a la parilla (charcoal grilled) was a delicious choice. Unlike typical grilled squid, there isn’t the grill marks and strong charred taste, rather it’s a very light smokiness. The dish is finished with olive oil, garlic, parsley and olives but could use a bit more salt.


To keep with traditional tapa bars, Bar Raval doesn’t accept reservations, given most are quick stops for people to grab a couple of drinks and light bites. The beautiful gothic restaurant itself has limited seating, so most diners are expected to stand and share table space. Recently, a decent sized patio opened providing more seating for those who like it eat sitting. Dining on canned goods still won’t be a regular practice for me, but if I had to do it, Bar Raval would be the place for me.

Overall mark - 7.5 out of 10


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 505 College Street

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog
____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!


Is That It? I Want More!

Other Gastro World posts similar to this:



Bar Raval Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato


La Vinia (Toronto)



Why is society so guarded from speaking to strangers? Sure, avoid the ones driving by offering lollipops and speaking to someone in a deserted parking lot is a bad idea. But, in most cases, I’ve found it’s a rewarding experience when I let my guard down and get to know someone.

Before I start recounting the food, allow me to explain how I was even able to break bread with Chef Fernando Garcia himself; eating his creations as he flitted from kitchen to table. It began with meeting Mikel Basurto, Innovation and Sales Director of WBG Wines Basurto & Garcia, where he was showcasing the company’s imported Spanish wines. Others at the event would simply pour without comment and off I’d go. But, Mikel waited and inquired how I enjoyed it – caring more about my experience than trying to educate me about the virtues of the award winning wines they were featuring.

La ViniaLearning that I’m a food blogger, he asked if I like Spanish food. Like would be an understatement – after all a cuisine that combines seafood, spices and makes Ibérico ham deserves more than that. But, I also grudgingly admitted to him that my paella experience in Barcelona was disappointing; a wet salty mess. Of course, there are great versions of the dish in Toronto, but the better restaurants also tend to be fancy, not at all the cozy restaurants of Spain where menus may or may not be available and you just graze while enjoying wine.

It was with the frank discussion he presented his business card noting if I want to try what I just described in Toronto to contact him. On most occasions I may have misplaced the card or after sobering up feel awkward reaching out – after all, he must meet dozens of people at every event. But, something in the universe was telling me to reach out and I did. After emailing over a few months we eventually found an opportunity where I could visit on a weekday (when the restaurant is closed), so Chef Garcia could properly take the time to introduce me to Spanish dishes.

Chef Garcia is no stranger around a kitchen, being a third generation chef of a family operated restaurant in Madrid. After training at the Lausanne Cooking Academy in Switzerland, the world’s first school focused on the hospitality industry, he worked all over the world including Spain, Hong Kong, San Francisco and Vancouver. In fact, it’s all the education and years of experience that Garcia feels some chefs now lack. In Europe, he recounts, it takes years of hard work to learn and perfect the craft before someone opens a restaurant; it’s a privilege that’s earned after putting in the time.

La ViniaHe decided to settle in Toronto as the city had a burgeoning culinary scene but still calm enough to allow him to enjoy both cooking and time with this family. So, La Vinia opened in 2012 in a smaller local on the unassuming Lakeshore Boulevard allowing him to focus on serving dinner only. He believes that a present owner and chef is important – he wants customers to know they are tasting his creations.

We started off with a glass of the Auxi wine, named after Chef Garcia’s wife (how romantic) and made at his winery. Crisp and dry it’s a clean tasting wine that goes well with Spanish cuisine.

La Vinia

And it was that wine that I sipped while enjoying slices of lomo Ibérico ($19.75; on the dinner menu also served with the jamón cut). Until this point, I’ve only eaten Ibérico ham, a fattier cut of the delicious acorn fed Spanish black pig. The lomo is derived from the pork loin allowing it to be less fatty yet retaining the delicate tender sweetness synonymous with the meat.


Another new taste for me was the chistorra, a vibrant red paprika sausage originating from the Basque Country. Despite its high fat content ranging from 70-80%, after it has been baked most of the fat melts and you’re left with a flavourful sausage that oozes a salty spicy juice as you bite through it. Christorra would be great for nibbling with a cold glass of beer and works equally well for brunch.


In fact, if La Vinia ever branches into brunch, the restaurant should consider serving it as a side with the pisto monchego. The dish is similar to ratatouille made with diced peppers, zucchini and tomatoes; except it’s stir-fried rather than baked so that the vegetables aren’t quite as mushy. Plenty of garlic and onion adds fragrance to the dish while a light hint of spice (perhaps some a chili oil?) gives it the Spanish flare. Topped with a perfectly fried egg, the rich yolk mixes into everything and goes great with the tableside crusty bread.


If the gazpacho ever makes it onto the menu as the soup of the day ($7.50), a high probability with the summer months descending upon us, you should try it. Less acidic than the tomato based Italian version, La Vinia’s is garlicky and contains a slight peppery zing that lingers at the back of your throat. Smooth and refreshing, it was a great transition from the starters to the heavier finale of the meal.


After talking so much about paella, Mikel must have insisted Chef Garcia make one so I can see how it should taste. The Valenciana ($24.75 per person) was liberally topped with chorizo, chicken, mussels, shrimp and calamari. But it’s the rice that makes it stand out: plump golden grains soaking enough liquid to soften it but still leaving the middle al dante. At La Vinia it’s not the wet mush that I ate in Barcelona, instead each grain was separated giving off the most delightful saffron and shellfish aroma. Indeed, some individuals may like a wetter soft paella, as a warning this wouldn’t be the dish for you.


Throughout the meal we sampled three Rioja wines, bottled in the Basque province of Alava. Mikel decided to serve three red wines from the Casa Primicia winery showcasing them from different years – 2013, 2010 and 2005. What a delightful experience to taste something through the years! The flavours really deepened and the wine seemed to taste smoother (Sommeliers, I know this is not the proper terminology) as we moved back in time.

The Primicia Joven Tinto 2013 is particularly fruity and when served slightly chilled makes it great for sipping in the summer. While the limited edition (10,724 bottles) Graciano 2010, was medium-bodied and went well with paella and red meat. Finally, the Gran Reserva 2005, a blend primarily made from Tempranillo, Mazuelo, Graciano and Grenache, was a full-bodied wine but has a nice fruitiness to it as well (I got a hint of berries).

La Vinia wines

After eating it was a wonderful to just sit around and speak to Mikel, Chef Garcia and his friends (a lovely couple who has travelled extensively through Spain and the wife who acted as a translator for me – thank you!). One thing stood out in particular to me – Garcia’s surprise to people describing working in the restaurant business. For him, yes of course it’s a way to make a living, but he never believed being a Chef was going to make him filthy rich (although there are plenty of celebrity chefs out there that have). Rather a restaurant is the medium for him to share his love of food with others.

When asked whether Toronto will be the last stop for him, Garcia already knows it’s not. Eventually, he would like to go back to his home town in Spain and set-up an intimate chef school with restaurant to impart his knowledge and years of experience back to others – I’d imagine a sort of full circle for him.

From my two hour meal with Garcia I can see how much he loves cooking and sharing the traditional tastes of Spain with others. “[Cooking is] the best thing in the world,” he explains, “you get to please everyone every day.”

Overall mark - 8 out of 10*
* Disclaimer: This meal was complimentary, but following my mission statement, rest assured I'll provide my honest opinion. 


How To Find Them
 Location: Toronto, Canada
 Address: 2350 Lakeshore Blvd West

Follow me on twitter to chat, be notified about new posts and more - https://twitter.com/GastroWorldBlog

____________________________
Gastro World's Grading System

  • Anything under 5 - I really disliked and will never go back
  • 6 - decent restaurant but I likely won't return
  • 7 - decent restaurant and I will likely return
  • 8 - great restaurant that I'd be happy to recommend
  • 9 - fantastic restaurant that I would love to visit regularly and highly recommend
  • 10 - absolute perfection!

Is That It? I Want More!

Other Gastro World posts similar to this:
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